Category Archives: computer

Watch Out for the F’ers

The Internet makes all other sources of  information irrelevant. Newspapers are too slow and expensive. Libraries are archaic, also too expensive and slow. Bookstores are dying. Anyway they all provide way more information than we really need. We just need a piece here, a quote there, nothing like the  sustained pieces of writing found in these places.

The only information we need is Fast and Free. Everyone is a writer. Everyone is a commodity and is forced to view commodities across the screen. News spreads faster than fire. News and information riddled with mistakes because it is Fast and Free and that is all that matters. Gross errors become truth or at least cast a shadow over the reality. We crave the attention of search engines.

I am leery of the calls to shut down the old-fashioned ways we find our information. Do this and humanity is fully controlled by governments, corporations, and well-organized  groups.

The information they want you to have is all that you can get. Each Internet search is custom geared to you and what others want you to know. Those with the most money and power get out their message and obscure other messages.

I know people are being groomed to no longer be capable of reading sustained essays or pieces of literature. Who has the time? I guess Candy Crush does win out. All we want are bits and bytes of info, well reviewed by others to highlight what we think we want to know or what others want us to know.

Think about the danger an out-of-control reading person may pose to those that support the F’ers. Anonymous reading is a threat. If you buy a newspaper, no one tracks your eyes online. If you enter a library or bookstore and read a book that is not attached to online scrutiny, your brain is free. You may stumble outside the appropriate point-of-view geared for your consumption by others.

Of course still peruse the Internet. See what’s out there, some of it is very useful. But realize that it is highly manipulated. Think about what you are giving up when you give up control to your sources of news and information. Yes, I know it’s hard to examine vastly different points of view from your own. But it stretches your gray cells and keeps you free. Or is freedom also an archaic concept?

The library may become the last place to go wild.

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Plugged In

DAILY PROMPT
1984
You’re locked in a room with your greatest fear. Describe what’s in the room.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/1984/

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A devise/system that demands every person must record and distribute worldwide his/her greatest fear.

Ah, we now have everyone’s fears in our database, excellent.

Alternate version:

An infinity spent in a waiting room with no books to read and no chance of interesting conversation. Or books exist within the room to read, but loud, annoying television/video programming keeps streaming into the room. The screen has neither volume control nor off button.

Haiku: Strange Land of Blog

DAILY PROMPT
Blogger in a Strange Land
What’s the strangest place from which you’ve posted to your blog? When was the last time you were out and about, and suddenly thought, “I need to write about this!”?

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/blogger-in-a-strange-land/


No blog so urgent

To blog here, there, everywhere

Slow – no haste – go home

 

A 21st Century Hermit

I regret that I live in the time of social media.

Not that I avoid the Internet. I do read Internet articles. Although I regret that I have commented on some of those articles. Now I try to keep the comment section closed. That has failed a few times, but at least recently I have refrained from leaving my own comments there.

With Twitter, I began to hate myself and some other people on that site. So I left abruptly. No regrets.

Sometimes I forget that this blog is social media. As I said, it’s mostly for me. I vacillate between boredom, ambiguity, and enthusiasm on these pages.

I don’t dislike the Internet. Every day I go there to look up answers to questions. When did Kurt Vonnegut die? April 11, 2007. When was William Shatner born? March 22, 1931. (Exactly four days before Leonard Nimoy was born.) Sadly, Nimoy just died earlier this year. Thanks for the info Internet.

But sometimes I visit the Internet and stay there in a daze. If ever there would be an opiate of the people, this is it. How many times have I clicked on the weather forecast and strayed to a dozen silly websites and then onto a game of Mahjongg? Let me count the wasted hours.

To maintain my anti-social stance, I will read more books. Real books. Ones that don’t track my reading style nor leave tracks of subliminal messages on my screen (my paranoia is justified, I’m only as crazy as the 21st century makes me). An hour of reading my book is a joy and equals a zero waste of time. I hope the libraries and bookstores don’t shut down before I die. Hell, I may be part of the last generation with this outdated preference.

My social life suffers because of my attitude. I have removed texting ability from my ancient phone. People seem to have a hard time figuring out how to communicate with me. No one calls anyone anymore or wants to leave a voice message. No matter, I may not check my messages for a day or two anyway. So far I have no desire to join Facebook. From what I hear, it can be a mega time-wasting enterprise.

My friends are fictional rather than virtual. I would rather travel in a book than in the real world.

Let me dig up my pencil and paper. Where is that old manual typewriter?  With pen in hand, I’m ready to read and mark up that old book. Excuse me while I step back into the 19th century. Middlemarch is waiting. To make matters worse, this is the second time that I read that tome. I love my social circle.

The Subversive Nature of Pens, Pencils and Paper

Pens and Pencils

When was the last time you wrote something substantive — a letter, a story, a journal entry, etc. — by hand? Could you ever imagine returning to a pre-keyboard era?

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_prompt/pens-and-pencils/


With a pen and paper, I am writing two drafts for my blog right now. I may or may not publish, depends how it goes. With a pen, I record every book I read in a notebook along with a short or long description and/or page reference to quotes that catch my eye. Also I do handwrite a few letters once in awhile.

My handwriting is horrible. Writing by hand helps me weed out more poorly written stuff. My crappy handwriting looks bad on the page and I can sniff out more stuff that sounds bad too. Stuff that looks bad in my opinion, you may say it’s all bad!

Everything looks pretty good on a typed computer screen. Looks great. Send. Publish. But looking good isn’t always good. Sometimes I think I should have waited and thought it out more. Even a great sentence looks like it needs revision when it is written in chicken scratch. Revise till you puke.

Also writing by hand feels more personal to me. No one else knows what I’m writing. (Unless there is a camera over there somewhere.) It’s all mine for a short time before it gets transmitted over the computer somewhere. Or it is all mine forever if I never commit it to a screen. It makes me feel a bit rebellious. So much of our lives are in the Internet loop, this one bit is free.

No data gathering, no key word search, no one else in my head. Until the machine begins to reside within my head?

Perhaps the blank page with pen or pencil will incite the rebel cause of the future to break free of the machine. That is if there are any people left that care about this kind of thing.

The Butterfly Effect: Wings, Blades, Eyelashes

Layman books on physics litter a portion of my bookshelf. I’ve read some of them and do remember the butterfly effect. A butterfly in Africa flutters its wings and a hurricane develops near the Florida coast. The innocuous becomes the monumental.

If the delicate wing of a butterfly alters events so dramatically, what about windmills? While windmills create a more benign form of energy, they may also alter events on this planet.

Machines and humans live symbiotically. Separation may no longer be possible. Machines keep increasing farm yields to keep both the weak and strong alive. Computers run commerce, governments, medical, and artistic endeavors. Travel, the worldwide version we crave, requires machines that consume vast amounts of energy. Small-tech devices meld with our bodies.

Over 7 billion pairs of human eyelashes flutter today. Nature tries to cull our ranks with bacterias and viruses and we fight back.

The human/machine creatures root for a clean, healthy planet. To maintain both is irrational. At some point, something must be sacrificed.

 

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_writing_challenge/the-butterfly-effect/

 

Stardate: 92161.36

An answer to the disproportionate war being waged by Israel against Hamas exists in Star Trek.

Specifically in the 47 -year-old episode called, “A Taste of Armageddon.”

The starship Enterprise carries a diplomat on a mission to a couple of planets, Eminar VII and Vendikar. The entire crew of the ship stumbles into a kill zone near the planets and is declared dead by a computer that carries on a war-simulation program. Everyone on the Enterprise is told that they must begin to enter a “termination booth” that will promptly vaporize them.

This computer-generated war has been waged for over 500 years. Machines indiscriminately select citizens from the two planets, and the rules of war mandate that they must enter the termination booth and die.

Buildings still stand, infrastructure remains intact, blood and body parts don’t litter the ground. If anyone tries to stop the demands of the computer program, real war must start up again.

The computers end up being destroyed at the end of “A Taste of Armageddon,” and the two warring planets decide to negotiate a peace instead of deal with a truly bloody, messy war.

Today the United Nations Human Rights Council believes that Israel’s response to Hamas weaponry should be more proportional. This old Star Trek episode provides a good model for a more proportionate mideast war. The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay, could even program computers to kill an equal number of people on each side of the war.

This civilized form of warfare is only fair. Navi, switch on your TV, Star Trek holds a sensible answer to your complaint. Or else it opens up a whole new world of absurd. Take your pick.